Credit

Steps To Remove CCS Offices From Your Credit Report

If you miss a debt payment for too long, the creditor typically sells it to a collection agency like CCS Offices. When CCS Offices takes over the debt, they are often ruthless in their attempts to get paid.

Typically, CCS buys the debt for less than it’s worth and then tries to get the full amount from you. While dealing with collection agencies isn’t fun, it’s even worse to have them on your credit report.

If you’re hearing from CCS, it’s important to learn how to remove CCS Offices from your credit report.

Find out if CCS Offices is on your Credit Report

Your first step should be to see if CCS Offices is on your credit report. They typically report to the credit bureaus, but you should find out for sure.

Pull your free credit reports here. Check all three and look for CCS Offices near the top. Collections show as public records and are one of the first tradelines on a credit report.

If CCS is on your credit report, take these steps.

Validate the CCS Offices Debt

Start by asking CCS for validation. In other words, you’re asking them to prove that you owe the debt and that they have enough information to report the debt to the credit bureau. If they can’t prove they have enough information, they must remove it from your credit report.

Here’s the kicker – you have 30 days from the first date they call you or write to you to validate the debt. If you miss your window, you have other options, but validating gets it off your credit report the fastest.

Write to CCS Offices and ask them as many questions as possible about the debt. They have 30 days to respond to your request.

Dispute the Debt with the Credit Bureaus

If you miss your 30-day window, you can dispute the debt with the credit bureaus. You must know which credit bureau they reported to – they don’t typically report to all three.

Write to the credit bureau they reported to disputing the information you think is incorrect. If you have any proof of what you think is wrong, include that too.

The credit bureau will compare the information you provide with the information CCS provides. The credit bureau and CCS have 30 days to respond to your request. If the credit bureau can’t prove different than what you stated, they must remove CCS Offices from your credit report.

Arrange a Pay-for-Delete Agreement

To get CCS Office removed from your credit report, you need to be diligent and follow up with the appropriate contacts.

If you weren’t successful with the above attempts, arrange a pay-for-delete agreement with CCS Offices.

This agreement means you agree to pay the debt according to the settlement you agreed on and CCS Offices agrees to delete the debt from your credit report once you pay it. 

The good news is you don’t have to pay the debt in full. CCS bought your debt for less than it’s worth so they have room to negotiate. Have a maximum number in mind and bid low, knowing that they will likely counteroffer what you suggest.

Once you reach an agreement, get it in writing. Don’t pay CCS Offices until you have the agreement. Without written verification, there’s no way to prove they promised to remove the tradeline from your credit report with payment. 

If they don’t hold up their end of the bargain and you paid the debt, dispute the tradeline with the credit bureau, providing the written proof of the agreement.

Why is a CCS Office Collections Bad?

Collection accounts hurt your credit score and they stay on your credit report for 7 years. If future creditors see that you have a collection, they’ll think you don’t pay your bills on time. There’s no room for an explanation on the credit report – it just shows that you defaulted on a debt.

It could make it difficult to get credit in the future.

Final Thoughts

Don’t leave CCS Offices on your credit report. There are many ways to remove the tradeline from your credit report. The account you defaulted on will already show that you defaulted, which hurts your credit score enough.

A collection only makes matters worse, but there are ways to remove it, especially if any of the information they provided the credit bureau is unfair or inaccurate. The law protects you, but you have to do the legwork to prove the tradeline doesn’t belong on your credit report.