Debt

Steps to Remove National Credit Services From Your Credit Report

National Credit Services is a debt collection agency. If you’re receiving phone calls or letters from them, you’ve likely defaulted on a debt. To make matters worse, if you’re hearing from them, they likely reported your debt to the credit bureaus. A collection can ruin your credit score and your chances of securing future credit.

If you defaulted on a debt, it’s important to know how to remove National Credit Services from your credit report.

Pull your Credit Report

If you aren’t sure if National Credit Services is on your credit report, pull all three reports here. If you see NCS on there, it’s time to learn how to remove it. Leaving NCS on your credit report can damage your credit score significantly and collections stay on your credit report for 7 years, making it difficult to get new credit.

Validate the Debt

If it’s been less than 30 days since NSC first contacted you, write a debt validation letter. It’s not as intimating as it sounds and it may be all you need to remove NCS from your credit report.

A debt validation letter asks NCS to prove they have the right to collect on your debt. First, ask them to prove the debt is real by proving the original creditor, debt amount, date of default, and how much you owe now.

Next, ask them to provide proof that they can collect in your state. If they can’t validate your debt or aren’t legally able to operate in your state, they must remove the debt from your credit report.

Dispute the Debt

If you missed your opportunity to validate the debt (you have only 30 days from the first date of contact) or they validated it, you may still dispute the debt with TransUnion, Equifax, or Experian.

Disputing the debt means you’re disputing incorrect or unfair information they reported on your credit report. If they spelled your name wrong, used the wrong account number, or incorrectly reported the balance – dispute it. You have the right to fair and accurate information on your credit report and any information that isn’t fair or accurate must be removed by law.

Arrange a Settlement

If you can’t remove National Credit Services from your credit report using any of the above methods, you may need to arrange a settlement. Even if you got the debt removed from your credit report, you’ll still owe it, so this step is valid either way.

The difference is if the debt is still on your credit report, you should negotiate a pay for delete agreement in the settlement.

Here’s how.

First, figure out how much you can afford to pay. NCS likely bought the debt for pennies on the dollar so you can negotiate an amount that’s less than the full balance. Start with an amount lower than you can afford because they will likely counteroffer any amount you suggest.

You can do this step over the phone, but don’t provide them with your bank account or even credit card information. Only make payments you can track, and that won’t give them access to your bank account information. 

National Credit Services, or NCS can be a serious issue for your credit, but if you are diligent and organized, you can get NCS removed from your report, and your credit restored.

But, if NCS is still on your credit report, you should also include a stipulation that they remove the debt from your credit report after you settle the payment. It’s called a pay for delete. While they aren’t legally obligated to accept your offer, most collection agencies accept it in exchange for payment.

If you get NCS to agree to the arrangement, get proof in writing. Don’t pay them until you have the proof. Even if you have verbal verification, there’s no proof for you to take to the credit bureaus if they don’t hold up their end of the bargain.

Bottom Line

Don’t leave National Credit Services on your credit report for long. A collection account hurts your credit score and your chances of getting future credit. The original creditor likely reported your defaulted account to the credit bureaus already, which damaged your credit score. A collection account is like pouring salt on the wound.

Take the steps above to remove National Credit Services from your credit report. It takes some due diligence and follow-up. Even if you get them to agree to a pay for delete agreement, follow up. Pull your credit reports 30 – 60 days after you pay the debt and make sure they removed it. If they didn’t dispute the debt with the credit bureaus to remove it for good.